Practitioner Credentialing in an Era of Heightened Employment, Consolidation: 4 Strategies to Tame the Beast

As more practitioners and newly-minted medical school graduates seek hospital-based employment, the need for quality credentialing grows. On top of this, as hospitals form more expansive networks and systems, small inefficiencies in individual credentialing processes compound and become increasingly disruptive at the network and system level.

Even the best hospital credentialing and privileging processes, when combined without a careful optimization strategy, can become Frankenstein-like. A monster with three arms can’t be agile, and the same applies to credentialing programs. Duplicative processes will slow the overall program down, engender frustration among practitioners and can become a significant financial drain.

“Healthcare entities often struggle due to a lack of experience, knowledge, resources or bandwidth to create effective policies and procedures for credentialing and onboarding activities,” says Sally Pelletier, CPMSM, CPCS, chief credentialing officer at the Greeley Company, a healthcare consulting and professional services firm. “But for healthcare organizations that do credentialing well, the positive results are substantial. They include reduced costs and risks, to both the patient and the institution, quicker performance and enhanced revenue, all centered on delivering safe, high-quality patient care,” she adds.

The above excerpt is from a recently published Becker’s Hospital Review Executive Briefing, Practitioner Credentialing in an Era of Heightened Employment, Consolidation: 4 Strategies to Tame the Beast for which Greeley’s Sally Pelletier, CMPSM, CPCS, and Amy Niehaus, CPMSM, CPCS, MBA, were interviewed.

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